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usnatarchivesexhibits:

Time Card for Albert Einstein, 07/01/1943 - 06/30/1944
Item from Records of the U.S. Civil Service Commission. (1883 - 01/01/1979)
Look at all the marks made by Albert Einstein on his time card. He used it to record his work schedule as he consulted for the U.S. government during WWII.
Source: http://go.usa.gov/jGHV 

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Time Card for Albert Einstein, 07/01/1943 - 06/30/1944

Item from Records of the U.S. Civil Service Commission. (1883 - 01/01/1979)

Look at all the marks made by Albert Einstein on his time card. He used it to record his work schedule as he consulted for the U.S. government during WWII.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/jGHV 

441 notes

amnhnyc:

Researchers Describe ‘Animal Pompeii’ in China 
Mixed graveyards filled with exceptionally well-preserved dinosaurs, mammals, early birds, fish, and reptiles in northern China are the result of lethal volcanic flows, according to new work by an international team of geologists and paleontologists, including Museum Curators Jin Meng and George Harlow. 
The finding helps unravel the mystery behind the preservation history of the Jehol Biota—an ancient ecosystem that existed between 130 to 120 million years ago. 
Read the full story.

amnhnyc:

Researchers Describe ‘Animal Pompeii’ in China

Mixed graveyards filled with exceptionally well-preserved dinosaurs, mammals, early birds, fish, and reptiles in northern China are the result of lethal volcanic flows, according to new work by an international team of geologists and paleontologists, including Museum Curators Jin Meng and George Harlow.

The finding helps unravel the mystery behind the preservation history of the Jehol Biota—an ancient ecosystem that existed between 130 to 120 million years ago. 

Read the full story.

138 notes

clirhiddencollections:

appendixjournal:

A reproduction (top) and the original (bottom) of the "wheel cipher" that Thomas Jefferson invented to send coded messages while he was Secretary of State. Jefferson abandoned the method in 1802, but it was reinvented immediately prior to World War One and was used by many militaries until the advent of World War II, when the wheel cipher finally became obsolete owing to the rise of devices like the Enigma.

This would have made passing notes in class far more interesting.

497 notes

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!
A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.
Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

erikkwakkel:

A snippet Jane Austen: how medieval!

A rare paper snippet in Jane Austen’s handwriting was discovered. Written in 1814, it contains highlights from a sermon held by her brother. Reading the news I was struck by the parallel with similar finds from the Middle Ages. For one thing, in both cases such discoveries raise more questions than they answer. Was there originally more than this? Why did Austen (and her medieval peers) create the tiny note? Why did it lay dormant for so long? The most intriguing question (and parallel) is related to what is actually hidden from view. While the front of the Austen-fragment can be read, the back cannot, because the snippet is pasted onto a larger sheet. Experts are trying to separate the two, hoping to double their understanding. This is as medieval as can be. Strips from medieval books, after all, are frequently found pasted - recycled - on bookbindings. These fragments also provide a tantalizing, albeit one-sided view at a discovered written object from the past.

Read more in this Guardian article, which is also the source of the image. More about medieval snippets pasted onto bookbindings in this post I wrote a while back.

(via uispeccoll)